Overview

Bay and bow windows are more than just windows. They are a bold and beautiful statement to any home-front and they offer a decorative touch to enhance the curb appeal of your home. Both bay and bow windows consist of several panels that extend out from the home, offering additional room on the inside of the house, as well as a gorgeous and dimensional addition to the outside of the house.

Bay windows originated as a feature of Victorian homes in the late eighteen-hundreds. Most Victorian homes had bay windows that were placed one on top of another for each floor of the building, creating the picturesque turrets that we picture with traditional Victorian architecture.  Generally, bay windows are composed of three panes that can be shaped like a polygon or a square, with pronounced angular bends. Bay windows can vary in size, some being almost floor to ceiling, and others smaller and placed above kitchen sinks as a perfect perching spot for house plants.

History


Bow windows, historically, originated prior to bay windows in the seventeen-hundreds mainly in the United Kingdom.  Much like bay windows, bow windows are usually comprised of three panes, but sometimes, may come with four or more panes to accentuate the bow. Instead of being angular in shape, they are graciously curved to form a cylindrical niche on the inside of the home.

Both bay and bow windows offer increased ventilation in the home by catching breezes that happen to be blowing along the side of a home. The benefit of the added space on the inside of the home is not only good for seating but also adds a beautiful decorative accent. Usually the casing installed with a bay window will be wood, and can be finished in a variety of stains and sealers to make for an elegant look and feel.

Recent Work

Recently, we installed a set of bay windows into a Colorado home transforming the aged windows into newer energy efficient windows that complements the exterior of the home.

Before

Bay-windows-before

After

After-bay-windows